The Self-Awareness Guy

being hurt

What Self-Awareness Isn’t

What Self-Awareness Isn’t


A lot of people think self-awareness happens simply by saying you have it. This leads to people insisting that they understand themselves well while leaving a trail of destruction wherever they go. Here are some examples of what self-awareness isn't:

  • Saying you do one thing and then doing another.
  • Having various parts of your life in conflict.
  • Saying you care about people but treating certain ones poorly.
  • Insisting you're happy and balanced when you have a lot of unfinished inner business to deal with.
  • You say you love yourself but you do things that hurt you.
  • Thinking and behaving in ways that hurt others.
  • Saying that other people don't have self-awareness and then doing things that demonstrate you don't.

Getting to know yourself well is an ongoing process where you comprehend why you think and do certain things and continuously move your life in a positive direction. You become so comfortable with yourself that you treat others with great care and compassion because you're deeply happy inside. What will you do to keep building self-awareness?

Cheers,

Guy



Joy in Life

Joy in Life


When I coach people they often tell me they have difficulty experiencing joy in their lives. Joy is a wonderful concept which I define as experiencing pure bliss and contentment. Joy is also complex in that we could not experience it if we did not also experience pain. A life of perpetual joy would soon begin to feel bland, so we need the ups and downs that come with everyday experience.

How do you define joy? Joy can be that moment at which you feel complete happiness and want for nothing else. It can be gazing into someone’s eyes whom you love or doing something that means a lot to you. Joy is what we experience when we work through difficulties and as we let go of the things that bring us down. Here’s what some smart people have to say about the matter:

Pearl S. Buck:

The secret of joy in work is contained in one word – excellence. To know how to do something well is to enjoy it.

Audre Lorde:

The sharing of joy, whether physical, emotional, psychic, or intellectual, forms a bridge between the sharers which can be the basis for understanding much of what is not shared between them, and lessens the threat of their difference.

Kahlil Gibran:

The deeper that sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain. Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter’s oven?

Cheers,

Guy

Water Seeks Its Own Level

Water Seeks Its Own Level

An important part of building self-awareness is understanding the reasons why you surround yourself with certain people and how they affect the trajectory of your life. Ever notice that people tend to hang out with others who mirror or reinforce their behaviors? That's great if they're doing wonderfully positive things but quite another if they're not.

Water seeks its own level because it doesn't want to be out of balance. People are the same way because they can only achieve at the level they are ready for and seek out others who are at a similar stage. Difficulties and complications arise when individuals are deeply wounded or hurt inside and connect with others who join them because they are feeling the same way. It's how groups of people band together and do all kinds of awful things.

Thankfully, you don't have to live your life stuck in one place, you can keep improving yourself, building your self-esteem, and working on being a wonderful person. As you live more fully and authentically, you will attract people into your life who value how genuinely healthy you are and want to accompany you on your journey.

What are your thoughts on water seeking its own level?

Cheers,
Guy

Self-Awareness and Thinking about Others

Self-Awareness and Thinking about Others

Perhaps you've met individuals who assure you they possess self-awareness and then trample all over other people. It's like the boss who says she's wonderful and caring and shouts at her employees or the husband who says he's a great guy but does things that deeply hurt his spouse.

When you have a high level of self-awareness you naturally think about others. The more comfortable and knowledgeable you are about what drives your thoughts, feelings and behaviors, the more likely you will be to feel happy and balanced and treat other people in a caring, compassionate way. If you solely care about your money, your power, your own success, your immediate needs, your safety, or your own point of view, you're less likely to think about other people.

The key to living a genuinely fulfilling, happy life is to realize that you can take care of yourself and others, not just one or the other. As you become healthier and more tuned in to who you are deep inside, you're much more likely to help others do the same. What will you do to keep building your self-awareness and thinking about others?

Cheers,

Guy

Selective Self-Awareness

Selective Self-Awareness

The path to self-awareness is populated by many individuals who claim to know and understand themselves but do things like:

  • Treat people poorly.
  • Work out their personal issues on others.
  • Don't understand why they think, feel and behave the way they do.
  • Are mesmerized or infatuated by the concept of self-awareness but reluctant to take a deeper look at themselves.
  • Are stuck thinking and behaving the way they always have.
  • Live life unconsciously.
  • Are healthy in one part of their lives but profoundly damaged in others.
  • The various parts of their personality don't interact well.
  • The have unhealed hurts and unresolved issues but conveniently ignore them.

When you possess genuine self-awareness you understand yourself on a deeper level and live a life of balance and compassion because you know your strengths and areas for improvement and are constantly working on being the most balanced and healthy you possible. You're whole overall, not just in bits and pieces. What will you do to move past selective self-awareness?

Cheers,

Guy