The Self-Awareness Guy

healthy leadership

The Three Most Important Leadership Qualities

The Three Most Important Leadership Qualities


Here are the three most important leadership qualities:

1. Empathy and Kindness

A lot of leaders I meet have an unwavering allegiance to the bottom line or some specific set of results and completely forget about the human beings who work for them. Leaders can have both a capability for getting results and behave with empathy and kindness. You don't have to be any less competent or driven to treat people well and understand their situation.

2. Being Healthy

I'm referring to leaders being people who have worked through their own issues and are psychologically healthy. I've seen too many people in leadership situations work out their own hurts on others; the end result is always tragic. If you're a leader who is unhealthy mentally, I guarantee it will eventually not only affect your employees negatively, but your organization and you too.

3. Self-Awareness

Most leaders I met have some fabricated idea of who they are but have very little understanding of how their emotions, thoughts, and actions affect others, or themselves. This lack of understanding causes them to do all kinds of things that not only hurt others but are also detrimental to the success of their organization.

Ask yourself how many leaders you know or have worked for who, as a norm, behave with empathy and kindness, are genuinely healthy psychologically, and possess a great deal of self-awareness. Most of our leaders are just people who can shout orders and appear decisive. I've found we can build leaders who not only get a lot done, but who also create much more kind and healthy workplaces. If this does not sound possible to you, then you might look into some training on the three areas we've discussed here.

Cheers,

Guy

Leadership and the Healthy Ego

Leadership and the Healthy Ego

Have you ever met a leader with a less than healthy ego? What did it do for your workplace? Many leaders live their lives through a wounded ego, wreaking all kinds of havoc. Ego refers to your inner perception of the outside world. This means that you can experience the world based both on your most noble and healthy impulses or most toxic and disabling. If your perception is positive, you’ll tend to view your role in the world as interconnected with others and you’ll interact in a healthy manner.

We often base our decisions on the security we feel about ourselves and our sense of balance and well-being. If you function more on the negative side of the spectrum you’ll tend to view the world based on your fears and feelings of insecurity. You might rely on mistaken notions of power, controlling others, need for attention, desire to dominate or yearning for acceptance

The challenge for leaders arises in that ego can reflect their most dysfunctional characteristics and they can get stuck listening only to that inner voice. If you only listen to the voice that reminds you of your insecurities or hurts then your work life moves in a certain direction. Answer the following questions to get a feel for how your ego is working for you.

1. In what ways am I constantly working on being the best person I can be?

2. In what ways do I get my stuff on other people?

3. In what ways do I depend on others to make me happy?

4. In what ways do I help build up others?

5. What is my view of competition?

6. What is my view of winning and losing?

As you answer these questions you will likely see a pattern emerging that will show you how healthy your ego is. Remember that your ego is healthy when you are so confident and secure that you’ll experience a great work life and help others do the same.  You don’t feel threatened by others and you enjoy their success as much as yours. A healthy ego will tend to stay in balance, reacting appropriately from calmness and kindness. For those of you who already live this way, you know the deep happiness that comes from liking yourself and appreciating others’ greatness as well. What will you do with your ego?

Cheers,

Guy

Leadership 101: You Don’t Have to Be Perfect

Leadership 101: You Don’t Have to Be Perfect

I often work with leaders who set a goal and then pile a bunch of other stuff on top of it and paralyze themselves before doing anything. Then they tell me that they’re afraid of doing something wrong or scared of messing up.

The idea that we do things wrong or mess up comes from inside our own minds and was often put there by our families. We repeat these ideas over and over, even when they lead to negative results. The interesting thing is that messing up is such a relative term because it really depends on your definition of it.

The next time you set a goal for yourself try focusing less on the whole “I’m doing something wrong and what if I fail,” outlook and set yourself up for success. Try the following ideas to let go of the need to be perfect:

1. Set an achievable goal you know you can do.

2. Do one thing at a time and don’t burden yourself with extra things.

3. Celebrate when you complete a task, do something to treat yourself well.

You only fail if you set yourself up for failure or listen to the negative messages inside your head. Success comes from setting realistic goals, completing them and moving forward purposefully.  One last thing… you really don’t have to be perfect.

Cheers,
Guy