The Self-Awareness Guy

Self-Awareness Examples

The Importance of Self-Awareness in Social Work

As someone with a family services, program management, and personal/professional development background, as well as an MSW, I've had the pleasure of working with a wide range of people, both self-aware and otherwise. A question that often crossed my mind as I worked with social workers is whether they understood the importance of self-awareness in social work. It's vitally important for social workers to possess a high degree of self-awareness because it directly impacts their clients. I'll share some real-world examples of social worker behaviors that are both self-aware and unaware. Here are some things social workers who lack self-awareness do:

  • They become enmeshed with clients to the point that they hamper the client's progress.
  • They are unable to determine where they end and the client begins due to a lack of healthy boundaries.
  • They aren't aware of how their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors affect them or their clients.
  • They function based on the need to dominate or control instead of facilitating.
  • Their self-esteem is derived from their clients liking or looking up to them.
  • They enable their clients' less-than-positive behaviors.
  • They prolong the worker/client relationship way past its expiration date.
  • They make clients dependent on them.
  • They are in constant conflict with co-workers, subordinates, and colleagues.
  • They make things more difficult than they have to be.
  • They refuse to work with other professionals due to their own personal issues.
  • They work out their personal issues on their clients.
  • They lack empathy.
  • They like power a little too much.
  • They make things difficult for others, often acting as a gatekeeper.
  • They yearn for public recognition.
  • They set up fiefdoms and zealously guard their power.
  • They haven't healed their own hurts before trying to heal others.
  • They're personally unhappy.

Although these behaviors are common in many fields, they are especially counterproductive in client/worker relationships because the client's wellness and success in life is at stake. On the other hand, social workers who possess self-awareness do things like:

  • Constantly work on healing their own hurts so they can be as healthy as possible for their clients.
  • Establish and adhere to healthy boundaries.
  • Do things that encourage collaboration with other professionals to help the client.
  • Possess empathy.
  • Are deeply aware of and are able to manage their own emotions, thoughts, and behaviors and understand how they affect their clients.
  • Are not interested in power, control, or having to appear special in some way.
  • They make things easy for people, going the extra mile to be helpful in a professional way.
  • They understand clients' issues are not theirs.
  • They have healthy, professional relationships with clients.
  • They facilitate the process of clients' finding their own answers.
  • They know how to help someone and get out of the way.
  • They're balanced, happy, healthy people.
  • They enjoy healthy personal and professional relationships.
  • They understand, value, and possess self-awareness.

One of the main reasons I write this blog is that I've seen my fair share of people damaging other people and I told myself many years ago that I would do what I could to help people become more aware of what they were feeling, thinking, and doing so they could live positively and build a better world for everyone. Ultimately, the importance of self-awareness in social work is that it greatly increases the well-being and chances of success for the social worker, the client, and the world.

Cheers,

Guy



Self-Awareness Reduces Anger

Self-Awareness Reduces Anger

One of the biggest benefits of building self-awareness is that it reduces anger. If you wake up each day and don't pursue your dreams, go to a job you hate, hang out with people who don't value the real you, stuff your feelings, or pretend you're fulfilled, you're very likely to be upset. Living this way leads to anger because you're just not happy. Here are some ideas on how you can use self-awareness to improve the situation:

  • Agree with yourself to move in a new direction.
  • Get to know who you are deep inside.
  • Understand your strengths and areas for improvement.
  • Choose one thing to work on.
  • Take action each day to create movement in your life.
  • Praise yourself each time you notice a positive change.
  • Repeat the process.

People feel unsettled and upset when they're not living authentically or doing things they find meaningful. What will you do to be less angry?

Cheers,

Guy



The Path to Self-Awareness

The Path to Self-Awareness

The path to self-awareness reveals itself to you as you're ready for it. Here are some examples of how you can tell that you're on your way:

  • You look at yourself without criticism or judgment.
  • You realize that there are things about you that can be improved.
  • You understand that life is a journey rather than a finite goal.
  • You have the courage to examine and continue healing your hurts.
  • You keep growing and learning throughout your life.
  • You see results in your life based on your thoughtful, kind, compassionate thinking and behavior.
  • You actively work on making your dreams a reality.
  • You live life as the real you.

If you do things like these, you know how great it feels to live authentically and share your gifts with yourself and the world; if you don't, you have a wonderful opportunity to visit many interesting places.

Cheers,

Guy



Self-Awareness and Seeing the Big Picture

Self-Awareness and Seeing the Big Picture

A lot of people think that working on their self-awareness is a selfish pursuit but they may be missing the point. When you deeply understand why you think or act the way you do, you move from being someone who lives unconsciously to someone who understands the implications surrounding their thoughts and behaviors. For example: If you get mad at friends or family all the time, you're behaving in a way that is specific and limited, whereas if you take the time to think about what you're doing and how you can move in a positive direction, you increase your ability to see things from a wider perspective.

You can choose to live life based only on what you think, feel and do in the moment but you'll be much happier and fulfilled if you pause and think about all the other options available to you. What will you do to use your self-awareness to see the big picture?

Take care

Guy

Self-Awareness and How You Treat Other People

Self-Awareness and How You Treat Other People

Many individuals walk through life missing the self-awareness to understand how their thoughts and actions impact others. One of the hallmarks of understanding yourself well is that it helps you be so happy and balanced that you treat other people well. The better you feel about yourself, the easier it is to interact positively with other human beings and create a more positive world. Here are some signs that you practice self-awareness and treat others with care and compassion:

  • You experience positive results from your interactions with others.
  • You create meaningful friendships.
  • You feel good deep inside.
  • Your relationships are reciprocally satisfying.
  • You don't have a lot of enemies.
  • People generally say nice things about you.
  • You experience very little conflict with others.
  • Your default behaviors are kindness and empathy.

I these outcomes sound familiar, you know how wonderful it feels to like yourself and others. Life is too short to behave negatively and step on others when there are so many other more positive options. What will you do to treat others wonderfully?

Cheers,

Guy