The Self-Awareness Guy

self-awareness leadership examples

Self-Awareness Leadership Examples

Self-Awareness Leadership Examples


People frequently ask me to give them examples of self-aware leadership. A good way to demonstrate the difference between leaders who possess self-awareness and those who don't is to describe how they behave during a training session. Imagine someone who behaves this way:

  • Doesn't listen.
  • Interrupts.
  • Gets angry.
  • Confrontational.
  • Talks too long.
  • Tells others what to do.
  • Has an opinion on everything.
  • Seeks attention.
  • Uncooperative.

When someone practices these behaviors in a training setting you can pretty much guarantee what they're like in the workplace. They likely are people who don't listen, interrupt others, get angry, confront people, talk too long, tell others what to do etc. Very often these individuals don't realize how they're behaving because they're so used to doing things a certain way.

This is why I emphasize self-awareness in my training programs. It's the ability to take a look at your own behaviors so that you can keep what works well and modify what doesn't. It's the capacity to examine who you are and behave in different ways. It means that you understand how your behaviors affect both you and other people. The goal of self-awareness is to become a more effective person and leader. Effective leaders practice the following behaviors the majority of the time:

  • Listen.
  • Don't Interrupt.
  • Moderate emotions.
  • Communicate instead of confront.
  • Listen more than they talk.
  • Encourage people to work independently.
  • Value other people's opinions.
  • Give people attention.
  • Cooperate and collaborate with others.

Leadership is often about consciously setting an example of positive behaviors in the workplace. A leader who behaves based on the first list will get predictable results in the form of a dysfunctional workplace while one who practices the behaviors on the second list will move in a more productive direction. There's no mystery to this process, positive behaviors lead to positive results. What do your behaviors say about you?

Cheers,

Guy

The Relationship between Self Awareness and Leadership

The Relationship between Self Awareness and Leadership

There is a huge relationship between self-awareness and leadership because self-aware leaders are far more effective than those who aren't. Here are some of the things leaders who possess self-awareness do:

  • They manage their own thoughts, feelings, and emotions.
  • They are comfortable with and understand their employees' thoughts, feelings, and emotions.
  • They're able to build positive workplace relationships.
  • They have healthy boundaries.
  • They're not hung up on power and control issues.
  • They work collaboratively.
  • They ask for help and welcome feedback.
  • They don't micromanage.
  • Their egos don't get in the way.
  • They build workplaces that are happier and healthier.
  • They understand how their thoughts, feelings, and emotions affect others.
  • They behave appropriately based on the situation.
  • They're able to listen to others without getting defensive.
  • They're calmer and more balanced.

Picture your workplace being run by leaders that possess these types of characteristics, it would likely be a positive environment. The challenge for many leaders is realizing that self-awareness simply means having the insight to put one's own stuff aside and be there to support others. This type of dynamic only happens when people in leadership positions are self-aware and healthy.

Cheers,

Guy