The Self-Awareness Guy

self-help

Your Self-Awareness Plan

Your Self-Awareness Plan


When you create a self-awareness plan it's important to remember to keep it manageable. You're far more likely to follow a plan that's practical and achievable rather than a huge, daunting document that scares you from the very beginning. Here are some ideas to help you develop an achievable self-awareness plan.

  1. Define what area of your life you'd like to focus on.
  2. Brainstorm things you can do to address that particular area.
  3. Pick one brainstorming item and take action.
  4. Evaluate what happens and either go back to step one or pick another brainstorm item.
  5. Repeat the process.

A lot of people get stuck in life because they take on too much at once rather than focusing their energy on one area. Try the process we've talked about here and check your progress after one month, three months and six months. You'll be happy with the results if you stick with it.

Cheers,

Guy


What Is Self-Awareness and Are You Self-Aware?

What Is Self-Awareness and Are You Self-Aware?


Self-awareness is a significant part of personal development and it refers to being aware of how your thoughts and behaviors affect you and others. Many people are aware enough to identify things that need attention in their lives but they forget to take action to make it happen. There's a big difference between knowing you do something and understanding it well enough to move it in a positive direction. Here are some signs you're self-aware:

  • You're able to deal with and direct your emotions, thoughts, and behaviors.
  • You build positive relationships, including the one you have with yourself.
  • You genuinely like yourself and others do as well.
  • You live life based on what you really love doing.
  • You know yourself well.
  • You treat yourself and others with kindness and empathy.
  • You understand how the things you feel, think, and do affect you and others.

Cheers,

Guy

Believe in Yourself

Believe in Yourself

When you possess self-awareness, you trust yourself to be your own guide through life. So many people put all their energy into believing in someone else or some abstract entity that they spend their entire lives neglecting their own inner voices.

The key to living a profoundly meaningful life is to stop looking outside for answers and turn inward instead. You have every answer you need inside you right at this very moment. They may sometimes be hidden somewhere in the recesses of your mind, but they're in there, and all you have to do is be willing to put in the effort to find them.

Believing in yourself means that you take an honest, candid look at the person you are, keep what's positive and change what isn't. This process requires considerable courage because you have to look at the issues you normally try to avoid. Fortunately, after you do the hard work and build up your self-awareness, you'll be rewarded with being able to let go of the things that hold you back and live authentically.

What's your advice for believing in yourself?

Cheers,
Guy

The Importance of Self-Awareness in Social Work

As someone with a family services, program management, and personal/professional development background, as well as an MSW, I've had the pleasure of working with a wide range of people, both self-aware and otherwise. A question that often crossed my mind as I worked with social workers is whether they understood the importance of self-awareness in social work. It's vitally important for social workers to possess a high degree of self-awareness because it directly impacts their clients. I'll share some real-world examples of social worker behaviors that are both self-aware and unaware. Here are some things social workers who lack self-awareness do:

  • They become enmeshed with clients to the point that they hamper the client's progress.
  • They are unable to determine where they end and the client begins due to a lack of healthy boundaries.
  • They aren't aware of how their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors affect them or their clients.
  • They function based on the need to dominate or control instead of facilitating.
  • Their self-esteem is derived from their clients liking or looking up to them.
  • They enable their clients' less-than-positive behaviors.
  • They prolong the worker/client relationship way past its expiration date.
  • They make clients dependent on them.
  • They are in constant conflict with co-workers, subordinates, and colleagues.
  • They make things more difficult than they have to be.
  • They refuse to work with other professionals due to their own personal issues.
  • They work out their personal issues on their clients.
  • They lack empathy.
  • They like power a little too much.
  • They make things difficult for others, often acting as a gatekeeper.
  • They yearn for public recognition.
  • They set up fiefdoms and zealously guard their power.
  • They haven't healed their own hurts before trying to heal others.
  • They're personally unhappy.

Although these behaviors are common in many fields, they are especially counterproductive in client/worker relationships because the client's wellness and success in life is at stake. On the other hand, social workers who possess self-awareness do things like:

  • Constantly work on healing their own hurts so they can be as healthy as possible for their clients.
  • Establish and adhere to healthy boundaries.
  • Do things that encourage collaboration with other professionals to help the client.
  • Possess empathy.
  • Are deeply aware of and are able to manage their own emotions, thoughts, and behaviors and understand how they affect their clients.
  • Are not interested in power, control, or having to appear special in some way.
  • They make things easy for people, going the extra mile to be helpful in a professional way.
  • They understand clients' issues are not theirs.
  • They have healthy, professional relationships with clients.
  • They facilitate the process of clients' finding their own answers.
  • They know how to help someone and get out of the way.
  • They're balanced, happy, healthy people.
  • They enjoy healthy personal and professional relationships.
  • They understand, value, and possess self-awareness.

One of the main reasons I write this blog is that I've seen my fair share of people damaging other people and I told myself many years ago that I would do what I could to help people become more aware of what they were feeling, thinking, and doing so they could live positively and build a better world for everyone. Ultimately, the importance of self-awareness in social work is that it greatly increases the well-being and chances of success for the social worker, the client, and the world.

Cheers,

Guy

Expect the Unexpected

Expect the Unexpected

As you work on your self-awareness you'll often find that things don't go exactly as planned. The key to success is to expect that things will change and that not everything will go your way. When you let go of the need to control events and people you'll be flexible enough to deal with any challenge. It will also allow you to be less stressed-out when things don't go the way you anticipated.

Cheers,

Guy